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Travel in Peru, Argentina or anywhere else in South America and DOS MANOS TRAVEL AGENCY will be your trusted guide. We are specialists in adventure tours and treks in Peru, including Lima City Tours, Sacred Valley and Amazon jungle excursions and an official Inca Trail operator to visit the famous Inca site of Machu Picchu. Also when you plan to travel to Argentina we can arrange for an unforgettable holiday including the breathtaking Iguazu Falls and exciting city of Buenos Aires and have years of experience organizing roundtrips to multiple other destinations such as the Galapagos Islands, Cancun and Rio de Janeiro. Our TRAVEL BLOG is constantly updated with insider tips, maps, photos and travel stories submitted by travelers just like you! A world of opportunity and adventure awaits you!

Visit Maras and Moray in the Sacred Valley of the Incas

20 Feb
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Maras Moray in the Sacred Valley of the Incas in Cusco Peru
Tuesday February 20, 2018 - Posted by

Visit Maras and Moray in the Sacred Valley of the Incas

When visiting the Cusco area while traveling in Peru, the Sacred Valley of the Incas is a must-see. Many travelers visit Pisac, Ollantaytambo, and Chincheros while doing a Sacred Valley Tour. However, there are also two two lesser known sites called Maras and Moray. Here you read why we recommend you Visit Maras and Moray in the Sacred Valley of the Incas.

Just 31 miles Northwest of Cusco (Peru) lies Moray. Moray is the number 20 of 127 top attractions to visit in the Cusco region ranked by the Tripadvisor. It is a must see for everyone. First photographed in 1931, these particular ruins have been carved into the earth just about 100 feet deep or more.

The most popular theory is that this site once was an Agricultural Laboratory to the Incas. With sixty percent of the world’ stood crop originating from the Andes the theory seems to fit well. Pollen studies have proven that the earth from each basin was once imported from different regions in Peru. From top to bottom the temperature can reach 20 degrees Fahrenheit and with each level in these circular basins being 2 meters apart one would assume it was apart of these experiments.
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La Restauración Anual del puente Q’eswachaka

26 May
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The Annual Restoration of the Q´eswachaka Bridge
Monday May 26, 2014 - Posted by

Viajar por el Perú es una aventura sin fin , ya que hay muchos lugares para explorar . Uno de sus varios tesoros escondidos es un puente tejido a base de fibras naturales, ubicado sobre el río Apurímac , puedes llegar allí en un par de horas desde Cusco. Su nombre es El Puente de Q’eswachaka o , su nombre viene de dos palabras quechuas : ” Q’eswa “, que significa ” trenzar ” y ” Chaka ” que significa ” puente ” . Es un sitio único, ya que es el único puente inca de su tipo que sigue existiendo hasta hoy en día. Se encuentra a 11.811 pies sobre el nivel del mar, tiene 33 metros de longitud, y cuelga a 15 metros sobre el río. El puente está hecho de materiales de nativos, en especial una hierba llamada ” q’oya ” . Los materiales utilizados para construir el puente al ser orgánicos se deterioran rápidamente y por lo tanto requieren una renovación anual. Las técnicas utilizadas para reconstruir el puente se han transmitido desde el siglo 15, cuando el puente fue construido por primera vez . Más tarde fue destruido por los propios incas al tratar de impedir que el conquistador español , Pizarro , llegara a Cusco. Finalmente, el Q’eswachaka fue reconstruido y se sigue manteniendo en buenas condiciones gracias al festival de reconstrucción que se celebra anualmente. (more…)

The Annual Restoration of the Q´eswachaka Bridge

26 May
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The Annual Restoration of the Q´eswachaka Bridge
Monday May 26, 2014 - Posted by

Travelling in Peru is a never-ending adventure as there are so many places to explore. One of its several hidden treasures is a grass, woven bridge located over the Apurimac River, at a few hours from Cusco. It’s name is El Puente de Q´eswachaka or, in English, the Q´eswachaka Bridge, formed from two Quechua words: “Q´eswa” meaning “to braid” and “Chaka” meaning “bridge”. It is a unique site to see as it is the only Incan bridge of its kind that still remains today. It is located 11,811 feet above sea level, it is 33 meters in length, and hangs 15 meters above the river. The bridge is made out of native supplies and a special grass called “q´oya”. These materials used to build the bridge deteriorate rapidly and thus require a yearly renovation. The techniques used to reconstruct the bridge have been passed on from the 15th century when the bridge was first built. Later it was destroyed as the Incas tried to prevent the Spanish conquistador, Pizzaro, from getting to Cusco. Eventually the Q´eswachaka was rebuilt and continues to be maintained in good condition with the annual Festival. (more…)